A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ?

f
1. preposition The abbreviation for 'from', but used as the universal preposition by true addicts because it's shorter than wi. See g, x (3).
2. verb01 The abbreviation for the 'flee' command. Classic usage: 'f o' ('flee out').
fangling
noun Any excessively modern additions; that which is newfangled. Q: "What do you think of the new parser?" A: "It's an improvement, but I won't be using any of the fangling".
FE
noun Short for 'front-end'; the interface between a player and the game. There is one FE for each player, so sometimes people will refer to eg. "my FE". The FE takes input from the player, and echoes it back. A component of the FE, the parser, then attempts to convert this into a meaningful command. This is passed to the binder, which is part of the interpreter. The binder assigns objects to nouns, creating a set of commands corresponding to the (hopefully) intended meaning of the parsed command. These new commands are then executed by the main part of the interpreter, and output is generated. This is passed back to the appropriate FEs, which present it to their players. See also vocabulary, front-end.
Note: this is how MUD2's FE system works. It is possible to split the parser from the pre-processor and post-processor, these latter two running on some computer other than the main host. In this case, the term 'front-end' is sometimes applied to the non-parser program, especially if it is graphical; a more proper term, however, is client.
feature
1. noun A MUD object which is referred to in a room description, eg. part of the furniture. It cannot be picked up, but may have other uses. See arch (2).
2. noun An interesting aspect of the game's programming, eg. "The tour feature is quite useful for guests". This is the normal sense of the word in computer-literate circles.
3. noun A non-irritating bug awaiting to be fixed, eg. "It's a feature of the invis spell that you can only cast it on players and mobiles". This derives from sarcastic usage of feature (2).
fee
noun In BL, a 10% deduction in points for people granted restores. A persona on 50K will be restored to 45K even if they could prove they were on 50K at the time of their demise (although many do exaggerate, accidentally or otherwise...). Also known as a tax or restoration fee.
female
noun A persona in the game which is of gender female. Some humanoid mobiles are also females. In general, gender in the game is not constant, and except for a few intransigent mobiles (eg. the man, the maiden, the dwarf king and queen) gender can be toggled readily. There are no differences between the sexes in the game except for a skewing of the probability distribution for attributes when a persona is created: male personae will tend to have a strength 10 greater than if they were female, and female personae will on average have a dexterity and stamina each 5 higher than if they were male. Otherwise, chosen gender only affects output and a few anti-porn commands. If a player claims to be a female, the assumption is that he or she is a male masquerading as a female. An informal convention appears to have emerged whereby personae that are socialisers are of gender female, whereas killer personae are usually male. See real female, male.
fighter
noun A persona which is unable to use magic. This will be because either it has not yet touched the touchstone, or it has done so but has subsequently used up all its magic. fighters are not a separate class to musers; musers can fight just as well as fighters, and have the ability to cast spells, too. Indeed, killers are hardly ever fighters because it is far easier to off someone if you can use magic on them; those killers who do occasionally use fighters do so only as a challenge. The only real plus that fighters have is that they can fully utilise the LS, whereas musers can't; even this isn't so great against an invis mage raining spells to cripple you, lower your dex and sta, dumb you so you can't call for help, and force you to pick up 50kg of assorted junk. Once fighters have maximum stats, which happens around super level, they're equivalent to one another in fights with other fighters. Well-armed champs can off unarmed Sirs/Ladies as easily as they could an unarmed champ. See stream (2).
F-key
noun Short for 'function key'. Some players use comms packages which allow them to define text which is transmitted when such a key is struck. For example, the route from the jetty to the vicious rocks may be on an F-key so the player doesn't have to rely on maps or memory. killers are notorious users of F-keys: they usually set them up with some non-name as the commands' object (5), then when they have selected their victim they will syn them with this target name. Consequently, their battery of fight-oriented F-keys will be victim- specific! Sometimes, F-keys are called 'hot keys', but the latter term does not properly apply to fully reprogrammable keys. See macro mode.
fob
verb1 An attempt to stop some lowlife from hassling you by sending them on a wild goose chase; usually, this will result in unpleasant things happening to them. P1: "Can I have another glow please? I quit by accident!" P2: "You can get a glow yourself by holding the uranium and sleeping at the shrine". See wind-up, cliffy, stitch up, scam.
FOD
verb1 Abbreviation for 'finger of death'; the expanded form is never used except to explain what the letters 'FOD' stand for... The most powerful spell in MUD, used mainly by wizzes to dispose of people who are annoying them beyond endurance. It derives from the 5th level anti-clerical 'finger of death' spell in the original 'Dungeons & Dragons' rules, which became a 7th level druidical spell in 'Advanced Dungeons & Dragons' and is now a 7th level wizard spell in 'Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, 2nd Edition'. Often spelled in lower case, but in threats the upper case version probably strikes more dread into the heart of a potential victim. FOD is consummately real-world extensible, applicable to any act of deliberate destruction from killing queued printer jobs to throwing a stone through a window. See mortal FOD.
FOD war
noun What arises when wizzes start FODding one another. Sometimes this is done in jest, sometimes it's in anger, although in MUD2 it's usually the former as wizzes have the capacity to make themselves unFODdable by other (non-arch) wizzes, which rather puts the mockers on anything likely to be interestingly gruesome.
four-eyed
verb0 When highlife enter the game, sometimes a message is sent to all players saying "For your information: <highlife> is worth <number> points if killed". As this is broadcast to everyone else in the game, it is therefore useless for the named persona to try and sneak around, eg. by going invis. Friends may therefore tell the victim that they've been four-eyed, meaning FYIed, ie. 'for your informationed'.
frazzle
verb0 Synonym of toast, usually used in the past tense. See also fry.
frig up
verb1 To increase the points and stats of a persona by a large amount in one fell swoop. This happens mainly in MUD1, where mortal wizzes often die by accident, and any crash means people lose what they've gained since they last issued a 'save' command. frigging up does happen in MUD2, but less frequently; an unadvertised change to the game which makes something previously safe cause a points loss might result in the first affected persona being frigged back up to their previous total. See restore, play up, kiss up, wizmort.
front-end
noun The long way of saying FE.
fry
verb0 Synonym of toast, usually used in the past tense. See also frazzle.
FS
noun The abbreviation for 'firestone'. See BS.
fun
noun The supreme emotional state which MUD players experience. Not the same as in English: fun in MUD can be quite the opposite at times! It is, however, intense, addictive and mind-rattlingly enjoyable. See also Have fun!.
function
noun The specification of how to interpret a command in MUDDLE. MUDDLE's functions are the equivalent of MUDDL's actions, but are only directly usable by players if they can be referenced via the vocabulary. Like MUDDL's, MUDDLE's commands are processed using a matching mechanism, but rather than being tabular in nature with arbitrary actions acting as guards, the class hierarchy is used. Incoming commands are compared against defined functions, taking the most specific match first (ie. lowest in the hierarchy), left-to-right along the parameters. Thus, 'hit(jack, axe0)' would match '{ hit player weapon }' before '{ hit object axe }'. MUDDLE is synchronous, which means its operators can be much lower level than in MUDDL without tripping over the signal/wait mechanism.
For comparison with MUDDL, here is the relatively straightforward definition of the function that implements the 'fix brand in sundial' command:
	{ drop gnomon sundial }:
	holdinga(second, object) 'o' ->>
		!? ("There's no room for " +
		    the%(first) + ", " + the%(second) +
		    " is holding " + a%(o) +
		    ", birdbrain.*N"),
	aflame(first) ->>
		!? (theu%(first) +
		    " is aflame! Put it out, you jerk,*
		    * you'll burn yourself!*N"),
		$(      checknkeeping(first)
			drop%(first, second)
			!! (theu%(first) +
			    " seems to be just the*
			    * right length for you to*
			    * be able to tell the time*
			    * from " +
			    the%(second) + ".*N")
		$) 
This isn't too hard to follow if you know programming in general, but points to note are: 'first' means whatever is bound to 'gnomon'; 'second' means whatever is bound to 'sundial'; the 'o' construct is an assignment to a local variable (o, in this case); '!?' means "print this as an error message"; 'the%' and 'a%' are functions defined elsewhere to return the definite/indefinite object strings of their parameters; 'checknkeeping' is a function which will abort if its parameter is being kept by the persona issuing the command; 'drop%' is the general transfer function from persona to container.
Note that unlike the MUDDL version of this example, in the MUDDLE one the brand can be retrieved from the sundial later. See action.
fungus
noun The class (1) name in BL for the 'toadstool' object. Since fungus is shorter, this is the form by which it is commonly known. See shroom.
FYIed
present participle A less imaginative (but shorter to type) version of four-eyed.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ?

e
verb0 The abbreviation for the 'east' directional command. Often capitalised.
east-west dyslexia
noun The condition of having an internal representation of the Land which is a mirror image of the real one. The usual cause is a wiring of w as "to the right" and e as "to the left" in the sufferer's mind. The affliction is very hard to spot - people have even made wiz with undiagnosed east-west dyslexia. Victims can be made aware of their condition if shown a correct map at the same time as corresponding ROOM descriptions, but generally they will be incurable by this time. Fortunately, east-west dyslexia is not fatal. There are no recorded cases of 'north-south dyslexia'. Variant spellings: east-west <any anagram of dyslexia>.
easy meat
noun Easy to kill, either because of incompetence (eg. a plodder), lack of resources (eg. they're on their way back to a brands hatch) or an inherent disadvantage in the current situation ("Sorcs are easy meat if you have the LS"). See meat.
easy stuff
noun Synonym of easy T.
easy T
noun Nominally, treasure which can be obtained with little effort. In practice, the term tends to imply that the risks are low and the rewards moderate. Going for easy T is a good way to increase your score by a modest amount without risking life and limb. "The dragon almost did for me last reset, I'm going for some easy T this time to build myself back up". Highlifes who go for easy T as a matter of course will be mocked (and perhaps HACKed) mercilessly for having such a wimpish attitude. Sometimes, easy T is used sarcastically to refer to objects which lowlifes find difficult to get but which highlifes consider chickenfeed. "The mirror? That's easy T". See hard T.
EKW
noun Abbreviation for 'evil killer wizmort'. A BL term used to refer to any highlife you don't recognise... In other games, the term EKWM is preferred, and EKW is restricted to 'evil killer wiz'.
EKWM
noun Abbreviation for 'evil killer wiz mortal'; similar to, and beginning to supersede, EKW (which is acquiring a more confined meaning as a wiz who is rather keen to dispose of mortals). Both terms are usually entirely capitalised.
empty
1. adjective The emphatic form of being sparse (1).
2. adjective An area that is played out can be said to be empty. See sparse (2).
3. verb1 The command to upturn a container so its contents fall to the floor.
4. adjective Being devoid of players, or at least of highlife. In this sense, the game can be empty without being remotely empty (1). "BL was empty yesterday, they must have all been watching the superbowl on TV".
enforced friendliness
noun The condition which arises when game management is so tough that anything which can marginally upset players is stomped on hard. The result is that everyone is superficially nice to one another, while building up resentment. MUAs with enforced friendliness attract plodders, but people with that spark dislike the oppressive atmosphere and tend to leave. Unfortunately, plodders are very numerous, so enforced friendliness makes economic sense (at least in the short term before they start gunging up the works when they made wiz).
EP
noun Abbreviation for 'experience points', ie. points. Some people will insist it stands for 'experience point' and add an 's' to it when they use it in the plural, but most don't. There is no dominant opinion as to whether the term should be in capitals or not. See exp.
erk!
1. exclamation Stunned surprise; being absolutely flabbergasted. P1: "You can summon the basilisk to the rapids" P2: "Erk!"
2. exclamation Not liking the consequences of what you've just been told. P1: "I've just seen <well- known killer> carrying the LS". P2: "Erk!"
Eros
noun The mobile who appears and shoots an arrow through the hearts of two personae. The term can be used as a verb, usually as a past participle: "I've been Erossed" (or "EROSsed"). If the two people who have been Erossed kiss one another, Strange Things happen. See Darling!.
Essex MUD
noun The original, 'classic' MUD version 3A which ran at Essex University from 1980 until 1988, from which virtually all other MUAs are descended. Also known as MUD1 (2) and SXMUD.
EUCW
noun Abbreviation for 'evil unethical cheating wiz'. What BL mortals call wizzes (behind their backs - they think!).
ex
verb1 To force a persona out of the game as a wiz, normally because their communications link appears to have gone dead. Q: "Why can't I talk to Kate?" A: "Her speccy caught fire, so I exed her". The past participle is sometimes used adjectivally, so "Kate is exed" and "Kate has been exed" are both acceptable.
examine fetish
noun Many SUAs have an 'examine' command, which provides more information about an object than its mere description. The result of this is that SUA players must 'examine' every object they ever come across, in case this reveals anything crucially important. 99% of the time, it doesn't... In MUD, the figure is 100%, so as not to hassle the players by obliging them to issue painful, pernickety, unnecessary commands that are better handled automatically. Nevertheless, there are some SUA diehards who consider that this is most unrealistic; such people are said to have an examine fetish.
exp
noun Short for 'experience', and virtually always in terms of points rather than levels.
explorer
noun A player who gets most fun out of exploring the Land. For inexperienced explorers this will mean exploration in the conventional sense, making maps and so on, but addicts will probably concentrate on establishing the game's breadth, and true addicts will go for depth (all true addictss have an explorer facet to their personality). Explorers focus on the game rather than on players, and are passive in that they like it to do things to them, rather than them doing things to it. See killer, socialiser, T-hunter, HCDS.
external
noun Someone who plays a MUA by calling in over some communications network, rather than by playing local to the host. Despite BT's best efforts, this term is now largely obsolete. Compare internal.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ?

d
1. verb0 Abbreviation for the 'down' directional command; often capitalised. Many twisting and turning routes can be remembered more easily in terms of going d a few times rather than as a string (3) of arbitrary directions. D is not an abbreviation for 'drop', and accidental use of it as such can cause distress and/or sillies.
2. noun When followed by a number, it refers to a particular dwarf, eg. D48.
dance floor
noun See ballroom.
Darling!
exclamation The traditional thing to say to the other victim of Eros, signifying that you're immediately ready to kiss if they are. P1: "Darling!" P2: "NRBL?".
database
noun The definition of the current MUD scenario. In MUD1, the database (written in MUDDL) really is a database, but MUD2's database (written in MUDDLE) looks like a proper program. The text that comprises the database is read in by another program (misleadingly referred to as the 'loader' or 'compiler') and interpreter-friendly intermediate code is produced. Only since 1991 has this program stopped being called 'dbase' - it's now the equally confusing 'mcomp'. When MUD is said to 'have a new database' it means that revisions to the MUDDLE code have been made and the changes are about to take effect. As a result, Strange Things may occur... See definition language, DB, version, Mist, Rock.
DB
1. noun Abbreviation for 'database'. "When's the new DB coming up?" See database.
2. noun Nickname of "The Dragon's Breath", the monthly on-line magazine for BL players.
D&D
1. noun Abbreviation for 'Dungeons & Dragons', the original role-playing game published by Tactical Studies Rules (now just TSR) Ltd. D&D influenced Richard Bartle concerning some additions to MUD version 3 (notably in having levels for personae); it had no influence on Roy Trubshaw. See class (2), FOD.
2. noun BL abbreviation for 'druids and dragon', referring to the cost-effective way of getting big T by doing these in combination.
dead
adjective Killed by some action of your own, eg. walking into the swamp while carrying a lit brand. You lose a few points, but not your whole persona. The term is sometimes seen in noun form as death. See dead dead, die (1), silly death.
dead dead
adjective Killed by having your stamina drop to 0 or less, usually in a fight (but eg. see FOD). If you're dead dead, you lose all your points, and your persona is eradicated from the persona file. You have to start again from scratch. Unlike many MUAs, if you die in a MUD fight it makes no difference who started it - this is seen as an essential aspect of sound game management, and a good way to build character (4). Sometimes the phrase is used in noun form as death death. See dead, die (1), take a fall, bloodlust.
deep
adjective Of a MUA, having depth.
definition language
noun The language in which the database is written. Some MUAs are hard-coded in a normal programming language such as C; others have some information kept externally in files, eg. room descriptions; more sophisticated ones (like MUD1) have some command information in these files; others allow all commands to be defined externally; a few (like MUD2) permit database items to be added from within the game itself. Strictly speaking, a definition language is the language in which the basic set of rooms, objects and so on are written such that substantially different game worlds can be modelled. See MUDDL, MUDDLE.
demon
noun A piece of program code executed when a certain specific event takes place, usually the elapsing of a period of time. demons are most often used to control timed events, such as combat, sleeping and 'auto' commands. demons are not mobiles in the normal sense - you wouldn't see one suddenly materialise in front of you - but they may be implemented using the mechanism that's employed for moving mobiles. See action, MUDDL, timers.
depth
noun The quality in a MUA of having detail; sometimes referred to as sophistication. It is the extent to which the MUA models its world, the implication being that the closer it is to the real world then the greater its depth (but see unrealistic). Unless there is an advertised reason why not, dropping a glass on a hard surface "should" break it; dropping it on a soft surface "shouldn't"; placing a box inside a larger sack "should" be allowed, unless the sack is itself inside the box, when it "shouldn't". depth is considered a Good Thing, but only if it is discreet: players like being surprised when mobiles are sensible about which object to use as a weapon, but they don't like being asked over which joint of which finger they want a ring to be placed. depth is best when unobtrusive. Compare breadth, see selective depth.
dex
noun The usual abbreviation for 'dexterity'.
die
1. verb0 What your persona does when either your stamina drops to 0 or you do something stupid enough to warrant a slap on the wrist from the game. Normally, whether you are dead or dead dead will be clear from the context, but sometimes the term is modified to make ambiguities clear. "Jojo the warlock died dead dead last night, but I don't know who to thank". On rare occasions, die die is used equivalently.
2. imperative One of the few sentences killers feel able to utter when they are hacking someone. That they have risen above the primitive mind soup of base instincts which characterises hack mode for long enough to waste a command on you can only mean one of two things: (a) you are losing by quite a margin; (b) the killer is losing but wants you to believe (a). See HAHAHA.
3. noun The 'die', an object in MUD. If you roll it, Strange (but not entirely unexpected) Things will occur.
dino
noun Someone who has been either playing or writing MUAs for a considerable time. This is usually relative to the game: an Internet player of 2 years' standing might be considered a dino, but on MUD2 they'd be regarded as comparative newcomers! For the abbreviationally-impaired, dino is short for 'dinosaur'; it is a term of approbation, a version of hacker (5) appropriate for MUAs.
do a <name>
verb0 To behave in a manner like that of <name>. Usually, <name> will be the name of some persona with a legendarily one-dimensional behavioural pattern, eg. "We'd part-emptied the T chamber, when suddenly he did a Phil on me!". In some cases, <name> will be an object or mobile name, eg. "He was doing a banshee - he jumped me in the swamp". Currently popular do a <name>s have been left out of this dictionary, in order to discourage in-for-me.
do for
verb1 To do for someone is to beat them convincingly in combat. "Melanie jumped me last night, but I did for her alright". mobiles can do for players, but the phrase does not seem in general to apply conversely, except when a mobile has been particularly belligerent. "I did for the vampy on my third attempt".
dog
noun The 'wolf' mobile in MUD1; dog is its class (1) name. Also known as doggy and doggie. See y.
dogfood
noun The champion/championne level, when considered as potential food for killers. To classy killers, attacking champs is like eating dogfood - it'll do if there's nothing else, but proper food tastes SO much better. The etymology is interesting, a combination of the title of the 1960's children's TV programme 'Champion the Wonder Horse' and the standard <level> meat construction. Since Champion was a horse, champion meat must be dogfood (although not necessarily in France...).
dog suggestion
noun A suggestion which the person making it thinks is brilliant in its originality, but which in reality is depressingly hackneyed. It derives from the most frequent such proposal: "We should have a dog! And it could follow you around!". MUD2 loathes and despises dogs, and will not even tolerate them as blanks... See undersea city and tidal.
doomed
adjective The fate of mortals as perceived by wizzes. A common prefix.
do the
verb1 To do the <subject> is to obtain the bulk of the points associated with <subject>. Common examples are doing the icons, draggy, fountain, Inn, Mine, goblins, snakes... The implication is that it will take some time. The the is often optional, especially in BL. It's an accepted excuse when asked to join in something that you're doing something else at the time. Q: "PC?" A: "Sorry, I'm doing the HH."
DOTM
noun Abbreviation for 'death of the month'. An award granted monthly to the mortal (or, exceptionally, mobile) which has suffered the most humorous/spectacular dead dead death in the preceding month. As with POTM, it is the wizzes who decide the winner of the DOTM award. There is no postfix on the recipient's name, however, as the victorious persona is by definition deceased...
dr
verb12 The abbreviation for the 'drop' command in MUD. Since all commands that relocate an object from a persona to some other container use the same MUDDLE routines, DR is also used as the shortened form of 'give' and 'insert'. "I'll dr you a call when my train arrives". See g.
the draggy
noun The dragon, MUD's most fearsome mobile. A term of endearment, "The draggy gave me a bit of a fright last reset". Sometimes just draggy, but it commands too much respect to lose its definite article very often. the draggy is an example of one of the few mobiles that has wiz privs. Alternative spelling: draggie. See y.
dream word
noun The magic word that comes to you as you sleep, the saying of which will enable you to recover some stamina if you can do so before anyone else. Sometimes, altruistic souls will tell you what it is in case you need it in an upcoming fight. However, see vial word.
driver
1. noun Another name for an interpreter.
2. noun Another name for a server.
drop carrier
1. verb0 What a player does when pslamming.
2. verb0 What the MUD host does when you log off it.
3. verb0 What the communications link between a player's computer and the MUD host does when it feels so inclined. See BT. Any of (1) to (3) may be abbreviated to dr carrier, as dr is MUD's abbreviation for 'drop'.
dwarf
noun Dwarf is a sub-class of mobile. There are more dwarf than any other type of mobile, and they live in the dwarf Realm. They have mixed abilities, ranging from dies-from-one-blow to casts-spells-and- steals-your-wafers. Dwarf guards are particularly awkward to kill, as they come in groups of three. NB: the plural of dwarf is dwarfs: there are no 'dwarves' in MUD! See PORG, stumpy, genocide.
dwarfing
present participle To be doing the dwarfs.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ?

c
1. verb0 The abbreviation for the 'commands' command.
2. noun The programming language in which MUD2's interpreter is currently coded. It is always capitalised in this context. C is derived from (and some would say is a bastardisation of) BCPL, in which MUD1's interpreter is written.
CAB
noun Abbreviation for 'contrived abbreviation'. Naturally, CAB is itself a CAB. Compare CAT.
castle in the air
1. noun A large-scale design for a new area of The Land which has obviously had many hours spent on it lovingly being refined, but which is nevertheless completely unoriginal drivel. Invariably, such material is submitted laser-printed and neatly bound in a folder by a plodder. See undersea city, tidal, baloons (2).
2. noun The stock reply to a MUD-ignorant journalist who asks what the next new addition to The Land will be. See size.
carrier loss
noun The sudden and violent interruption of the communications link between a player's computer and the host upon which MUD runs. Such is the way that telephones are constructed, this will almost always happen during combat, thus leading either to the death death of the persona concerned (in which case the affected player will moan about it) or, mythically, to the escape of the persona (in which case the opponent would moan about being cheated out of points for the kill). More often than not, both players concerned will moan. See pslam, BT.
CAT
noun Abbreviation for 'contrived acronym term'. A name is a CAT when it consists of tortuously implausible letter assignments in an effort to construct a real (or at least pronounceable) word. The name MUD is an archetypal CAT, as are MUG, MUSE and most other MU* derivations. Unsurprisingly, CAT is itself a perfect CAT. Compare CAB.
champ
noun Generic, gender-independent form of the 'champion/championne' level. See dogfood.
char
noun The usual contraction of character (1) (2).
character
1. noun A synonym of persona. Aside: In the olde days, MUD used to keep information about personae in separate files, one per player, instead of having a single persona file. The name of the file was CHARAC.TER, and each player could only have one per file system. Later, they were allowed several of the form <name>.MUD, eg. NODDY.MUD, but the readiness with which players could edit these files soon lead to the development of the present persona file system..! Many people, especially newbies, refer to personae as characters (or as chars), although true addicts rarely do so unless their pedigree goes way, way back.
2. noun What an ASCII code represents, usually with the implication that it's printable. Since keyboards can produce symbols which are neither letters nor numbers (eg. '@', '~', '^', '{', ':'), they're all (including alphanumerics) referred to as characters. Indeed, character can be used where 'letter' would suffice, eg. "You can't SYN names 20 characters long!". Contraction: char.
3. noun The quality of having an interesting personality. "Phred is a lovable ol' character".
4. noun Strength of personality. "Don't kill his first sorc, he hasn't the character to bounce back just yet". See test, take a fall.
5. noun The quality of having a likeable, consistent and/or powerful atmosphere. "The Tearoom has real character".
6. noun The quality of being well-behaved. "She's always seemed to me to be of sound character, but this business with the icons is disturbing". See restore (1).
class
1. noun A collection of objects sharing similar permanent traits, in particular their common properties and uses. classes are arranged in an hierarchical fashion (a directed, acyclic graph, rather than a tree) and objects are therefore almost always members of more than one class. The main classes are objects, features, players, mobiles, containers, rooms and treasure. As an example of how classes are arranged, consider an object like the music box (box4); its place in MUD2's hierarchy can be represented something like this:
 
Bleah!
Note that in MUD1, objects are members of exactly one class, so for example brands are of class 'torch' but nothing else is, and they're not of class 'wood'; artificial classes have to be invented for some objects, eg. 'access' is the class for 'door'. Even worse bleah!
2. noun (Incorrectly), either muser or fighter. Sometimes, people brought up in a role-playing environment assume that these two distinctions are what D&D-style games call 'character classes', however they're not. Fighters are simply musers who can't use magic, and any advantages they have over musers can be counted on the fingers of one hand (and that's without the thumb!). The correct terminology is stream rather than class.
3. noun (Incorrectly) either PP or non-PP. Having found out that (2) is wrong, role-players will pick on the distinction between PPs and non-PPs as a place to hang their definition of class. Unfortunately, there is no agreed way to refer to these two groupings yet (although class in the D&D sense is definitely unacceptable), and it is therefore a little harder to prevail upon role-players that they are still wrong.
clean out
verb1 To remove all goodies from a room or area. "I cleaned out the Inn at the start of the reset, but I should have raced for a decent weapon instead".
client
noun A program which is run on a computer other than the host which facilitates connection to the game and manages its input/output so as to meet the player's requirements. This usually means a combination of pre-processor and post-processor facilities that augment those already performed by the FE. The particular program with which the client communicates is the server, which in MUD2's case means the FE, but which for most other client-using games means the interpreter itself.
cliffy
noun A rather old term which deserves to be brought back to the forefront of MUDspeke: a cliffy is a fact you tell a clueless newbie to stop them from pestering you for information (or, alternatively, as a joke). It can range from merely sending them on a wild goose chase ("Well where do you _think_ you'd find a gold club?") to the downright evil ("You use the <whatever they just asked about> to jump off the cliff" - this is the example which gave rise to the term). See scam, rumour, wind-up, fob.
clique
noun A group of similarly-minded wizzes, usually arranged against another group of similarly- minded (but oppositely-minded to the first group) wizzes. If the game gets too top heavy with active (2) wizzes, such fragmentation is bound to arise sooner or later, leading to game management problems. See brigade.
clueless
adjective Not having the mental facility to figure something out. This can be due to lack of experience (as in clueless newbie), lack of information ("Don't ask me, I'm clueless") or lack of mental processing power ("I've looked at the new mausoleum puzzle for over an hour, but I'm clueless").
clutch
noun The traditional collective noun for a group of zombies. Sometimes applied to other mobiles when several of the same type are encountered at once, eg. a clutch of dwarfs. By extension, jokingly used of large numbers of single-location guests, novices, mortals...
CMP
noun Abbreviation for 'Camelia Memorial Plaque', an object in the VAX incarnation of MUD2. A trophy awarded to mortal mortals in a yearly combat competition. There never was a persona called 'Camelia': this was a joke on the part of the competition's organiser. We split our sides laughing at that one... See GC.
command
1. noun Meaningful text typed by a player to control a persona (usually their own, but not always...). Commands are written in a regular subset of English using words from the vocabulary and strings, the grammar being hard-wired into the parser. Commands are distinct from input, in that they've got past the parser successfully. The name comes from the observation that most of them are imperative sentences, although there is a smattering of interrogatives (eg. 'who', 'is', 'where'). Commands are passed from the FE to the binder part of the interpreter, which will dereference the nouns into objects (if possible) and create a set of single-object commands which can then be interpreted. See object, FE, vocabulary.
2. noun The main verb of a command (1). See object (5), instrument.
comms
noun Communications. The (usually phone-based) connection between the player's PC and the host. There are many comms problems that can intrude on a player's enjoyment of the game, most notably carrier loss and line-noise. The player runs comms software, which communicates through an RS232 port with a modem; the modem is attached to a telephone, and this is linked across BT's super-flaky network through specially-modified static-generating lines to a comatose exchange out of which a battery of further "best by June 23rd, 1943" lines wend their circuitous way to the modems attached to the host. These are arranged with a special trip switch such that if for any reason one of them becomes unusable, so do the rest. NB: modems attached to BT's network will not work if they have no large green circle on them. Or, for that matter, if they do. See also client, server, lagged off.
CompuNet MUD
noun The incarnation of MUD1 on the CompuNet network in the UK, the first commercial MUA in the world. Although an identical version 3A to Essex MUD, CompuNet MUD was characterised by bad game management which led to poor morale, plodders as wizzes, permanent hacking and slaying, and general all-round chaos. It ran from 1984 until 1987, when CompuNet abandoned the DEC-10 they were using.
CompuServe MUD
noun What non-BL players call BL when they can't remember its name.
container
noun The class of objects which can hold other objects inside them. Although, in theory, mobiles, players and rooms are all containers, the term is used in normal conversation to mean portable containers like bags, sacks, boxes and such. Officially, these are 'endocontainers', whereas mobiles etc. are 'exocontainers'.
cramped
adjective Having too many players and too few rooms. See sparse (1).
creature
noun The class consisting of all players and mobiles, ie. objects which are capable of issuing commands. Normally, creature is only used in describing the parameters of commands, eg. "You can follow creatures, but only help players". Most players will say both player and mobile if they mean them together, although true addicts might say "<cre>".
creds
noun Contraction of 'credits'. See creddies.
creddies
noun Credits, the unit of payment in MUD version 4B, and still used to refer to the time units charged in 4E. The term is gradually falling into disuse as it becomes superseded by the more street-wise creds. See Y.
curse
1. verb1 The 'curse' command.
2. noun See POTM curse.
cycles
1. noun The theory that an incarnation of MUD will swing pendulum-like from a period of pleasant, peaceful play into a state of vengeful, vindictive violence and back. The cycle from peace through war back to peace is reckoned to be around a year. "If you don't like it, quit and come back in six months".
2. noun Units of machine CPU power. "I wish people wouldn't keep setting up all these blanks, it takes up too many cycles".