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j
verb0 Abbreviation for the 'jump' directional command. See jump (1); it is never, apparently, used as an abbreviation for the other senses of jump.
juicy
1. adjective Of a persona, worth lots of points; just waiting to be killed.
2. adjective Of a weapon, doing lots of damage. See good weapon.
3. adjective Of anything, being much better than objects having a similar primary use, eg. juicy wafer, juicy potion, juicy area.
jump
1. verb0 The 'jump' directional command.
2. verb1 To ambush someone, normally from the point of view of the victim. "If you're thinking of jumping me in the hut, forget it!". 'Ambush' would perhaps be used by the attacker, as it implies that the deed has been planned previously and executed efficiently, whereas the victim would likely prefer not to attribute such deviousness to their opponent... See PP.
3. verb0 In MUD1, where resets can co-exist simultaneously, to leave a reset prematurely in the hope of getting into a fresh reset ahead of everyone else.
junkie
noun What the news media call people who play MUAs a lot. The term is shunned by players, especially if prefixed with the word 'computer'. Anyone who willingly admits that the term applies to them in a MUA context is automatically conferred with ploddership. players prefer to call themselves (or, more likely, others) addicts.

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i
1. verb0 Abbreviation for the 'inventory' command. It is not the abbreviation for 'in', which is considered quite short enough already.
2. first person singular nominative noun The same as 'I' in English except written in lower case to save messing about with shift keys.
I CAN HEAR!
exclamation The traditional thing to say to someone if they start talking in capitals, eg. they catch the caps lock and don't notice.
iconner
noun The individual who is tackling the golem for the icons. See med.
ie
suffix See hedgie, y.
illegal
adjective An act is illegal if it is something which the game management has decreed is illegal. For mortals, most things that might be considered naturally illegal are stopped by the game itself, eg. giving large numbers of points to other personae by kissing up. For wizzes, the game doesn't usually intervene, and actions are only illegal if the wiz has deliberately flouted the tenets of the GWG. In practice, the number of things which are illegal is usually very low, as stiflingly rigid game managementcan snuff out anyone exhibiting that spark, leading to a game full of plodders. However, most MUAs worth their salt will ban bullying, looby looing, pslamming and perhaps multi-lining.
imbalance
noun The opposite of balance.
impure
adjective The opposite of pure, applied to a real or proposed version of MUD (1) which incorporates changes that run counter to ideals held dear by whoever is making the comment. the game "will never be the same again"/"will be abandoned by all its players"/"will become a laughing stock" if the proposed changes are made. Although some wizzes may point the finger of impureness because they simply don't like the idea that future players might find life easier than they did as a mortal, the real die-hards have an almost doctrinal attitude which they defend with all the logical vigour of a dedicated flat-Earther. Typical examples of things deemed impure at one time or another are the introduction of PPs, the removal of berserkers, the very notion of blanks, and increasing the amount of surface T available. Only unusually do wetter players cry impure to demonstrate their compassion for lesser beings, arguing that changes should not be imposed because they'd make the game too difficult ("No-one will ever make wiz if you raise the points needed from 76,800 to 102,400."...); pureness in MUD is a weapon of conservative forces rather than liberal ones.
IMPCG
noun Abbreviation for 'interactive, multi-player computer game'. What BT call MUAs.
inactive
noun The opposite of active (2).
inbalance
noun The opposite of balance preferred by people who can't spell.
incarnation
noun An instantiation of a MUA on a particular machine or system. Although the programming is the same, the players and game management can be widely different. For example, CompuNet MUD and Essex MUD were both incarnations of MUD version 3A, but they evoked greatly different atmospheres.
incognito
adjective A wiz masquerading as a mortal so as not to be bothered is said to be incognito. The wiz may be debugging, or might just want some relief from the pressure of being a wiz. An incognito persona is usually a small, scratch persona that the wiz doesn't mind if it gets killed. Sometimes, it may be known that an incognito persona is being played by a player who has made wiz on some other persona, but not which such wiz it is; many wiz killers are of this variety. See undercover, EKW.
inconsistent
1. adjective What arises when the game treats differently commands that ought to behave the same way. This can be the result of simple omission ("The man can drink potions but the thief can't"), over-generalisation ("If you attack one snake they all get a vendetta against you") or selective depth ("I can make a model of the Eiffel Tower out of these matchsticks but it won't let me do Notre Dame"). The first two are normally buglets, the third is more of a feature (3).
2. adjective Not the way the real world would do it. "I find it inconsistent that you die when you blow yourself up. You should just lose stamina". The pedant's version of unrealistic.
in-for-me
adjective Said of a player who is attempting to accrue a reputation. Such people will tend to do things with one persona and try and spread their fame using other personae that they think are secret. In case you're too dim to have noticed, the term comes from a miserable pun on 'infamy'. Q: "Jack just told me he's done a Ned - what's that?" A: "Ignore it, it's just in-for-me". Sometimes shortened to informe or (strangely) informy.
in place
adjective An object is in place if it is located in the same room as it normally starts a reset. Q: "Wh boats?" A: "Raft and dinghy in place".
input
1. noun What you type at your FE. It may or may not be parsable into a command. See output (1).
2. verb1 The act of creating input (1). "You should input your name when it asks you". See output (2).
instrument
noun In grammatical terms, the 'indirect object' of a sentence. In MUAs, the basic form of a sentence is <verb> <noun> <preposition> <noun>, and therefore the second <noun> is the instrument. The first <noun> is the object (5). See command (2).
internal
noun Someone who plays a MUA by connecting directly to the HOST as opposed to using a comms network. This term is now largely obsolete. Compare external.
interpreter
noun The part of the MUD system which executes commands in the context of the current world model (commands are also said to be 'interpreted', which is basically synonymous with 'executed' here). Commands arrive non-deterministically from FEs, and are queued up on arrival. They are taken in turn, processed in full, and the results passed back to the FEs for the attention of the players. The manner in which a (MUD2) command is processed is defined in MUDDLE, but essentially it is first passed through a binder to tie the nouns to objects, then actually executed, and then output streams are examined and text despatched as necessary. NB: this describes the operation of MUD2's interpreter, which is synchronous; MUD1 uses a synchronous approach, fusing the FE and interpreter into a single program and employing a system of signals and waits to guarantee single-user access to critical areas of memory. The use of the word interpreter comes from the fact that the program interprets intermediate code derived from the definition language rather than executing a compiled version directly. However, as it can also be seen to 'interpret' the language of commands, the term can be applied to all such programs whether they interpret the definition language or not. The interpreter is also sometimes known as the driver (1). See c (2).
invis
adjective Synonym of 'invisible'. If someone says "I'm going invis" it means they won't be on the 'qw' list for a while, but they'll still be around. See vis.
inviso
noun BL slang for an invis persona, usually implying a mortal.
It's just a game!
exclamation A fanatical belief held by evangelising heretics which insists that MUD is nothing more than a mere game, and that players should not get over-emotional about what happens in it. There is little controversial about the assertion that MUD is a game (although it's polite not to draw attention to the fact); the really contentious issue is the suggestion that it's 'just' a game. It's far, far more than that! Adherents of the It's just a game! principle have clearly had some awful experience early in their MUDding career, and it has damaged what few brains they had in the first place. See real world.

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h
1. verb0 The abbreviation for the intransitive 'help' command. It means "I want the game to fill my screen with information that might be of use to a newbie" (see c (1)).
2. verb1 The abbreviation for the transitive 'help' command. "I want to assist this persona in doing something that requires the effort of two or more personae".
hack
1. verb1 To attack a player or mobile. "She hacked my mage a month ago!"
2. verb1 To get the better of a player or mobile in combat, usually implying that the fight was one-sided. "I was hacked to bits by the rats!"
3. verb01 To be in combat (with something). "Shut up, I'm hacking dwarfs". See die (2).
4. verb1 The traditional computing meaning: to produce something that works but which you'd have done better given more time. Optimised for write-time rather than run-time.
5. verb1 Another traditional computing meaning: to explore and experiment with a system in a playful manner.
6. verb1 The traditional news media interpretation of (5): to break computer security with a view to starting World War III.
7. noun The victim, or intended victim, of an attack.
Note that all the above verbs can be made into nouns, but it's more likely to happen with (1) "She had a hack at my mage" and (4) "This routine is a complete hack". In all cases, a hacker is one who hacks.
hack and slash
adjective A variant of hack and slay. Sometimes written as hack and /.
hack and slay
1. adjective Descriptive of a period of frenetic activity where everyone is being wild and murderous. The exact opposite of slack and hay. When the game turns into a hack and slay session it's time to set aside your main persona, bring on a dispensable one, and then to cause as much mayhem as possible in the full knowledge that you'll be dead dead within ten minutes. During a period of hack and slay, it is common to say/shout "hack and slay!" a lot of the time; apart from conveying the right ambiance, it also warns people just arriving that their personae may be somewhat at risk... See Mist.
2. verb0 To take part in a hack and slay session. Q: "What happened to your mage?!" A: "I got into hacking and slaying a little too deep last night...".
3. verb0 Interspacing the playing of MUD with serious hacking work.
4. verb0 Slicing your way through hordes of oncoming mobiles. "If you want to kill dwarfs, get hold of the SS - it's great for hacking and slaying".
hack attack
1. noun The sudden impulse to go on a rampage of wanton destruction.
2. noun A sustained period of play, usually in order to achieve some goal eg. making wiz. It derives from the mainstream computing meaning. See session, wiz run.
hack into
verb1 To break system security. "I never wrote that! Someone must have hacked into my account!". See hack (6).
hack mode
noun A state of intense concentration entered into by killers when they are lining up to jump someone or are actually in the process of hacking them. You could set fire to a player in hack mode and they wouldn't notice.
HAHAHA
interjection Maniacal laughter. The actual number of repeated HAs is indeterminate, but it is always at least three and usually around six or seven. killers will sometimes shout this when they have won a fight, or, more rarely, when they are on the point of winning one. The BL equivalent is MUAHAHAHA. Not to be confused with HEHEHE. See die (2).
hallowed
noun The 'hallowed chamber' room, where people med. See ancient.
hang
verb0 When your terminal sits around doing nothing it is hanging (or hung). This can be caused by comms problems (you're using the wrong terminal settings), game problems (the interpreter just crashed and the FE hasn't realised it yet), too many players (so your commands take ages to process) or by executing a single command that takes a long time to process (eg. issuing 'empty coracle' when it has 20 items in it will take about the same time to interpret as 20 individual 'drop' commands would).
hard stuff
noun Synonym of hard T. Nothing to do with alcohol!
hard T
noun Treasure which is difficult or risky to come by. The rewards may be high, but they're not necessarily worth it. "I like Valetant, but he's hard T really".
hassle
verb1 To make life difficult for someone. This can range from talking to them when they don't want to be talked to, through incessantly pestering them, to stealing things from them, hitting them and to attacking them. Normally, hassling is petty, but it can be quite vindictive. Wizzes will sometimes hassle mortals as part of a test, but more often than not it's inadvertent - the wiz is simply immune to hints that the mortal doesn't actually want to explore their latest blank area right now or whatever. It's possible that someone can be hassled by a group of players but not by a single individual: if there's one mortal and five wizzes, each wiz may be well below the bounds of hassling but from the mortal's point of view "the wizzes are hassling me!" If someone systematically hassles a particular player, that becomes bullying. See also tweak.
Have fun!
imperative The traditional way of signing off to someone who will continue playing after you quit.
HCDS
noun Abbreivated form of Hearts, Clubs, Diamonds, Spades: the theory that all players in a MUA can be categorised into one of four basic types. Consider the following graph:
Players who get more fun out of the fact they're in a world, rather than the fact it's shared, are T-hunters if they also prefer to experience rather than to learn, and are explorers if they prefer to learn rather than experience. Players who prefer the fact that the world is shared over the fact that it's a world are killers if they like experiencing the world with others, and socialisers if they prefer to learn from others (ie. gossip!). The horizontal axis is sometimes labelled PEOPLE/GAME, and the vertical ACTIVE/PASSIVE. socialisers are 'hearts', killers are 'clubs', T-hunters are 'diamonds' and explorers are 'spades', hence the theory's name.
Hearts, Clubs, Diamonds, Spades
noun The almost-never-used full version of HCDS.
hedgie
noun A pet form for the 'hedgehog' mobile. Unusually, the ie ending is preferred to the more common Y ending. The other common abbreviation used is hh.
HEHEHE
interjection Laughter, as written in conversation. It can mean a number of things, from "what I just said wasn't serious" to "what you just said was amusing". If someone told you that a particular player you knew had just scored 60 points, you might say "oh, the same as his IQ, hehehe"; this is an insult, but the HEHEHE flags the fact that you meant it only in fun and don't /really/ think his IQ is 60... Sometimes, players will use 'hehe' for variety, or mistype as 'eheheh'. You may occasionally see the equivalent bulletin-board flags of '<g>' (for 'grin') and ':-)' (a smiling face), but these have fallen out of fashion in the main. Compare HAHAHA.
help
1. verb01 The 'help' command. See h.
2. interjection As in the phrase "help at rapids"; it that means the speaker is in combat and requires back-up - now!
hh
noun The 'hedgehog'. To do the hh is to perform the task associated with it. Sometimes fully capitalised, for no good reason! See hedgie.
high level
1. adjective In absolute terms, descriptive of a persona which is well on the way to becoming a wiz. Mages are all high level, warlocks probably are, necros possibly are, and sorcs probably aren't.
2. adjective In relative terms, closer to wiz than the rest of the group under discussion. In a reset full of novices, a sorc is high level. In this context, the term is often used in comparative or superlative form, ie. higher/highest level. Sometimes you even see things like "If there are two mages, I always attack the one that's highest level".
3. adjective In programming terms, far from the machine. C (2) is (supposed to be) a high-level language.
For all the above, the term may be either hyphenated or unhyphenated - it's usually hyphenated only when directly before a noun or adjective. See level, and the equivalent entries under low level.
highlife
noun personae well advanced along the road to wiz; usually mages, or perhaps warlocks who have recently been mages and are likely to regain their status soon. Deriving as an alternative to the term lowlife, highlife was originally a collective noun, used either in the singular (to refer to the group as a unit, eg. "When the killers come in, the highlife quits") or in the plural (to refer to members of the group, eg. "Today's highlife are wimps"). A growing number of people would also accept "She may only be a sorc at the moment, but she's a highlife really"; in this form, the plural is normally highlifes (rarely highlives), eg. "All three of my personae are highlifes". Any of these variations may be hyphenated, but true addicts don't normally bother. Wiz mortals are usually excluded from considerations of high/lowlife. See lowlife.
hog
1. verb0 To hold most of the useful objects, eg. keys, FSs, rings, picks, wafers, parachutes, boats... It's easier to hog in MUD1, and can be a problem there; in MUD2, there is usually a replacement around (albeit in some out-of-the-way location). See genie, tie up.
2. verb1 To hold most of a particular class of useful objects. "You're hogging the keys!"
3. noun Someone who consistently hogs.
honeypot
noun A room which draws personae to it very frequently, thereby acting as a place where they can encounter their fellows accidentally. honeypots are usually designed with this purpose in mind; examples in MUD2 are the Tearoom and the swamp (1).
hoover
verb1 Picking up large numbers of low-value items. the term is general, and implies no particular strategy: it can be used to refer to both glooping and scooping up (2).
host
noun The computer or network upon which a MUA runs. Players typically use communications software of some description to link to the host, which does the majority of processing (although some FE activities may take place at the player's end). When MUD2 was first launched, BT placed a series of advertisements using the slogan "the host in the machine", trying to convey the impression that: (a) the game was welcoming and friendly; (b) a lot of people would be playing it; (c) an expensive ad agency had been involved to produce such a boldly weak and inappropriate pun (on "The Ghost in the Machine", a quotation from chapter 1 of "The Concept of Mind" by Gilbert Ryle). Sadly, to computer-literate (but literature-illiterate) modem owners, this proved merely confusing ("But the host _is_ the machine, surely?"). See carrier loss, comms.
hot potato
noun A heavy object passed between combatants in MUD1 so as to weigh them down a lot. Conventional wisdom has it that this will make it harder for them to hit you. The tactic is less effective in MUD2, where even the mobiles will drop such items, and where the act of giving things exposes you to attack.
hot tub
noun The 'barrel' object in BL.
hunchy
noun Pet name for the 'hunchback' mobile. See y.
hut
noun The room where people traditionally meet up after one of them has done the icons. It is close to the swamp, but rarely visited except on purpose. Killers will sometimes turn up there uninvited and attempt to steal the icons; this is not quite as much fun as killing, but it nevertheless causes enough suffering for killers to derive fun from it.

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g
1. verb12 The abbreviation for the 'get' command in MUD. As with 'drop', there are related commands that use the same MUDDLE routines, namely 'steal' and 'remove'. G is the archetypal one-letter verb, as in 'g t f z'.
2. noun The abbreviation for 'goblin'. You can 'g t f g' if you like. Sometimes, specific goblins may be abbreviated by number, eg. "Watch out for G10, he's mean...".
gaining wizdom
See wizdom.
galleon
See ship.
the game
1. noun MUD from a play-oriented point of view, as opposed to one which is, say, scenario- or FE-oriented. When you are playing MUD, you are in the game. If you say to someone, "I'll see you in the game", it means you expect to encounter them while playing MUD. The phrase the game is never used adjectivally, unlike the term MUD. See also not part of the game, real world.
2. noun Technically, that which is written in MUDDLE (or MUDDL) rather than that which is programmed to interpret it, or that which it interprets. This actually corresponds almost identically with (1), although only true addicts or programming language hackers would probably appreciate the fact.
game management
1. noun The process of ensuring that the game is generally fun for its players. Game management is necessary because with so many different people playing from different backgrounds and having different attitudes, conflicts are bound to arise. Game management aims to ensure that these are dealt with fairly and in a just manner. Game management policy is usually formulated by the arch-wizzes, and enforced day-to-day by the wizzes (arch-wizzes handle inter-wiz disputes). Common causes of moans are the behaviour of killers (especially wiz killers), vindictive insults/abuse, perceived unfairness, and more mundane things like cost and carrier loss. Logs are essential for good game management, as players involved in disputes often misunderstand or misinterpret what has happened - something they may think is wiz interference could actually be the result of legitimate action by players, for example. Common errors of game management are inconsistency ("You resurrected him but you didn't resurrect me!"), believing that the customer is always right ("Well gee, if you suffered carrier loss I guess I'd better give you back all your points"), and feeling sorry for someone ("I restored her, it was her first necro"). Equally bad is petty-minded intransigence ("I don't care how much you grovel in apology, the FOD for saying 'darn' stands!"), over-enthusiastic rule enforcement ("How did you know to say hi when he entered, you never typed QW? You're multi-lining!") and lack of trust in wizzes ("I know you say you wouldn't have FODded her really, but how can I be sure of that?"). Game management can make or break a MUA, so guaranteeing that it is sound is a prime objective of its owners. See CompuNet MUD, enforced friendliness, GWG.
2. noun The people who perform game management (1). "It's like the mortals think they're game management!"
gang bang
noun A fight where one persona is attacked by two or more personae working together as a team. Primarily a BL term; MUD2 players normally use bundle.
GC
noun Abbreviation for 'Goat Cup'. This is a vaguely annual competition for wiz mortals to demonstrate their fighting prowess (or, more likely, their lack of it). It is named after the goat, MUD2's most conspicuously belligerent mobile. In BL, the GC competition is characterised by arcane rules of inordinate complexity. "I can't be bothered with tax forms, they're as bad as GC rules".
genie
noun A class (1) of mobile, the members of which exist solely to relocate specific objects during a reset. In particular, they will redistribute parachutes, boats, keys, trinkets and certain pieces of paper - in other words, objects which could lock out whole areas if they were deliberately disposed of early on. Relocation will be to a safe forest, and only takes place if the candidate object is reasonably out of play (eg. alone in a room or swamped). Glimpses of genies are rare, but not impossible: you may sometimes see one appear in your room to drop off some object before disappearing to do the next one on its list.
genocide
noun A BL term for killing all the dwarfs; also known as dwarf genocide. It's not too difficult if you have the wand, but it's a lot of fun. There is no MUD2 equivalent, although it is occasionally practised; dwarf bashing, which merely results in the death of large numbers of them, is more frequent. See bash (1).
GFC
1. noun Abbreviation for 'grandfather clock', the object in MUD2.
2. noun As (1), but the small area inside the object, rather than the object itself.
glitzy
1. adjective Beautifully pure and sweet. "This new sword is really glitzy". "I love dreams, they're so glitzy". Only people with that spark are capable of appreciating glitziness. Anyone exhibiting glitzy play is a great snoop.
2. adjective Impressively fast. "When there were no batch jobs running, MUD on the VAX was really glitzy". This is the mainstream computing use of the term.
gloop
verb1 To collect large amounts of low-valued T; this takes longer than collecting small amounts of high-valued T, but carries less risk and hurts less to abandon mid-way through when some crazed killer suddenly shows up on the 'qw' list. The routes taken can be varied, making glooping less mindless than most other methods mages employ to try increase their points tally, but it can still be done on auto-pilot. It differs from scoop up (2) in that it is the main tactic being employed by the player; scooping things up is usually incidental to some greater objective (and hoovering is goal-independent). The origin of gloop is unknown: MUD1 and MUD2 only use the word as a sound effect with reference to the 'fiery pit', so it seems unlikely to have derived from there.
gobblies
noun The goblins, collectively. It gives a nice impression of hordes of ineffective knee-highs jumping up trying to eat you.
go berserk
verb0 To enter berserk mode. In MUD1, the command to do this was (imaginatively) 'berserk'.
go down a level
verb0 To lose sufficient points to pass the threshhold to the next lower level. See level, go up a level, go over, make <level>, novice (3).
goodies
noun Desirable things. Usually T, but the term can include other useful objects.
good snoop
noun A good snoop is one in which useful information was obtained. "I had a good snoop yesterday, I saw how to do the Keep". See snoop, great snoop.
good weapon
noun A weapon which is particularly effective in a fight, eg. the BS. A non-weapon might "make a good weapon", if used in a fight, but it still probably won't be as effective in the long run as a proper (albeit bad) weapon. See bad weapon, weapon, juicy (2).
good wiz
1. noun A wiz who abides by the recommendations of the GWG.
2. noun A wiz who is fair, just and respected. Ideally, being a good wiz (2) follows from being a good wiz (1).
go over
verb0 A BL way of saying to make wiz, although they say that too. See wizdom.
gotta
verb1 A contraction of ('I have') 'got to'. "Gotta quit, strawberries for tea!" "Gotta get to the swamp, Norg's fighting Grooble".
go up a level
verb0 To gain sufficient points to pass the threshhold to the next higher level. See level, go down a level, go over, make <level>.
great snoop
noun Someone is a great snoop is it is fun to snoop them. A term of mountainous approval. "Catch a load of Nadine, she's a great snoop". Unlike good snoop, the term is used to refer to the persona being snooped (ie. the snoopee) rather than to the act of snooping itself.
guard
noun Any of the dwarfs from the sets of three purposely located in the dwarf Realm with the intention of offing intruders. These chaps are tougher than most ordinary dwarfs (which is why they got the job!), so look out.
guest
noun A temporary persona with limited commands at its disposal, present only so that prospective players can play for long enough to pique their
interest. guest personae are deleted automatically when the player who created them leaves the game. See tour, puest.
gutted
adjective How one feels when one of your personae, to which you have become deeply attached, is killed dead dead. There's no other word for it. You have to experience it to understand...
GWG
noun Abbreviation for 'Good Wiz Guide', the document that fashions the scope of wiz powers in the game. Not available to mortals... See wiz interference, good wiz.