A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ?

r
noun Abbreviation for 'rat'. If you just want to attack one, remember to 'k a r' rather than 'k r', as the latter may prove a costly error (see rats! (3)). Sometimes, specific rats will be referred to by number, eg. "I had R0 trouble just now - boy is that one a pain...".
race
1. verb0 To try and get to particular objects at the start of a reset before anyone else gets them. Racing lasts for the first five minutes or so, while people run around putting together their kit from the most useful items they can find. Particular things raced for are good weapons, wafers, vials, parachutes, keys, rings and FSs.
2. verb0 More generally, to try and get to particular objects after any public announcement that they're free. "I'm quitting now, kit 2 w of swamp". See brands hatch.
rammed
past participle To have been attacked by the 'ram' mobile. "I hate it when I'm rammed at the start of a reset".
rats!
1. noun The mobiles of class 'rat'. The exclamation mark is not normal in this usage.
2. exclamation Darn! Dammit! Something didn't work out how I'd planned, hoped or expected.
3. noun The situation of being attacked by individually-trivial mobiles (sometimes players) in such numbers as to become problematical. You knock one out, and tsk, up springs another to take its place. true addicts might additionally use the expression 'crows!'.
real addict
noun A plodder who is also an addict. Someone who spends all their waking lives and a good part of their sleeping ones thinking about MUD, under the sad misapprehension that they will eventually make wiz. Plodders will call themselves real addicts with pride, although anyone else usually means it disparagingly.
real female
noun A player who is female in real life. The corresponding term real male seems to be unused. In the UK, the existence of real females is rare to the point of myth. Only by actually seeing the person in question sitting down and playing the game with a style matching what has already been observed over time is it even contemplatable that a player is a real female. Being a real female is not fatal; it's regarded by most players as an interesting quirk, like having red hair or actually being called Conan in real life, and it therefore tends not to make any difference. Unfortunately, though, there are some male players who will attempt to seduce anything they feel is likely to be really female with a probability exceeding 20%. Similarly, such antics are not discouraged by the occasional real female who advertises the fact and attempts to use it to gain friends and influence people. Yes, sadly even MUD is not completely immune to the seepage of sexual politics from real life... See female, male.
real life
noun An emphatic version of real world. Not only does it imply that there is a place other than The Land in which you can exist, but - horror upon horrors - you can actually do things in it as well! The very notion is sacrilegious to true addicts. See real world, You mean..?, the game.
real-life persona
noun A variant of real-world persona, but considered tacky.
real mortal
noun A mortal persona being run by a player who hasn't made wiz, openly or not. It's almost the same as a mortal mortal, but it implies that there is some doubt as to whether this (or other mortals under discussion) is actually being run by a masquerading wiz instead. See also wiz mortal, real player.
real player
noun A mortal being run by a player who does not have a wiz persona. The distinction between this and real mortal is subtle, but it carries more force: the speaker has little doubt that the player behind the mortal is genuine. See also wiz mortal, mortal mortal.
real world
noun The aspect of reality occupied by players and computers, rather than the persona land maintained by MUD. The term can be used adjectivally if hyphenated. Sometimes the words are capitalised, and sometimes they're subsequently abbreviated to RW. MUDspeke words and phrases which are generalisable from MUD to the real world are said to be real-world extensible, eg. "FOD job 2991", "Time to reset my desk...", "My supervisor looby looed all the credit". See also real life, You mean..?, the game, real-world persona.
real-world persona
noun The character (1) the player plays in the real world. "I know I'm a pushover here, but my real- world persona is a Post Office counter clerk". If you feel that you really must mention the real world, this is the preferred way to do so as it implies that it's yet another game and that your main persona is the 'real' you. Sometimes, real-life persona is used instead. See also masquerade, real female.
reaper
noun A supermobile. Originally, the 'grim reaper' was a specific mobile regularly created to cull highlife on account of the creating wiz's inability to do so using a wiz killer. Now, however, the term is used to refer to any prowling wiz-created mobile that metes instant death to any mortal unfortunate enough to encounter it.
rearrange the furniture
verb0 The act of repositioning objects that are normally found in one place such that they are somewhere else instead. wizzes do this, either as a joke or as a test. Yes, guys, there's nothing more hilarious than spending thirty minutes doing the crown only to find that it's been replaced by a carrot...
regall
adjective Short for 'regain all stamina'; applied to the potion or vial of that nature.
rehi
interjection "Hello again". A way of greeting someone when you've just returned after leaving the game for a moment, eg. to answer some mail or make a coffee.
reset
1. noun The event whereby all personae leave the game, and everything is automatically replaced to its starting position. There are five types: a mortal reset is caused when all mortal personae in the game have pressed the 'reset button'; a wiz reset is when a wiz does the appropriate Strange Things that instruct the game to begin a reset prematurely; crashes happen if there is a fault in the game which needs a reset to clear it; shutdowns occur when the system needs to be taken down temporarily to make alterations; auto-resets cut in 105 minutes since the previous reset - most resets are of the auto-reset variety. You will get warnings for auto-resets, and the personae concerned will normally tell you when wiz and mortal resets are impending. Crashes and shutdowns don't always warn you, but you'll know they've happened!
2. verb1 The process of resetting. "Can you reset the game, please? It's played out": a common bleat in MUD1.
3. noun The 105-minute period between reset events. 'Early in a reset' means when the game has recently reset; 'late in a reset' means when another reset is soon due; 'mid-reset' means the period in between. See race, set.
4. noun The encapsulation of everything that happened between two reset events. "I had a really good reset last night, I got almost all the big T and offed Jaxon". See session, set.
restoration fee
See fee.
restore
1. verb1 To frig up a dead dead persona to its state immediately prior to whatever led to its elimination. Someone who can prove that they lost carrier by accident, or who is known to be of impeccable character (6), may be restored.
2. noun The act of being restored. "I demand a restore!". In some incarnations of MUD (eg. BL), players get one taken-on-trust restore so long as there are no suspicious circumstances and the affected persona isn't nearly wiz level; subsequent requests for restores are treated less sympathetically. "You should have had your phone fixed after the last one". See fee, tax, frig up.
RL
noun Abbreviation for 'real life'. See real life.
road opp cott
noun Contraction of 'road opposite cottage', a room and sometime meeting-place. Before The Land was expanded so as to link to Valley, this was the starting location. See Tearoom.
Rock
noun A DATABASE written in MUDDL which used to run on the MUD1 interpreter at Essex University. Rock was the first such database to be written independently of the authors of MUD1, using only the shell of basic commands provided. Its 100-room scenario was the 'Fraggle Rock' TV puppet show, augmented with some rather inventive weaponry that stretched MUDDL to its limits. It inspired the creation of several other games in MUDDL, most notably Mist.
Rock was written by Phil Fox in 1983, but was subsequently lost for several years until an ancient back-up tape (yes, tape!) was found, whereupon it returned to life until Essex University's DEC-10 was switched off in early 1991.
ROFL
verb0 Abbreviation for 'rolls on the floor, laughing'. The term reached MUD2 via BL from CompuServe and comms in general, and it's now a command (1) in both games. See act, LOFR.
role-play
1. verb0 A feeble attempt by a player to evade responsibility for acts committed by their personae. "You can't blame me for killing your mage, I was only role-playing".
2. noun The oppressive restrictions imposed on personae in some MUAs with a view to forcing them to behave in a narrowly stylised manner. Plodders seem to enjoy this no end.
3. verb0 Traditionally, what players will be able to do if a game has mystique. By playing personae as if they had a purpose and a personality, this should engender a general atmosphere of detail, lore and (virtual) realism which is self-perpetuating. Unfortunately, although many players would love to play in a world populated by role-players, they rarely want to bother role-playing themselves... "Everyone wants to be a lion, no-one wants to be a gnu".
Note: Role-play should properly be spelled rôle-play, but since 'ô' isn't in the 7-bit ASCII character set no-one bothers.
RNG
noun Abbreviation for 'random number generator'; sometimes sarcastically expanded to 'rong number generator'. A peculiarly BL phenomenon is the unshakeable belief that random numbers are not truly random and can cause manifestly unfair behaviour by the game, especially in fights. "I had the LS, four wafers and she was asleep, but she had the RNG on her side".
rookie
noun A new wiz; one that has recently been permed. A BLism.
room
noun A location in a MUA where your character may go. Even places with no walls, such as seas and forests, are rooms! Rooms are linked together in a directed, cyclic graph usually known as the travel table (2). Rooms are a kind of container. NB: in MUAs employing a co-ordinate system for positions, the term may have a more specialised meaning particular to that game. See size.
ruby-eyed
adjective Under the influence of alcohol. A marvellous term deriving from the effects of the 'plonk' that some players drink (which causes ruby-coloured eyes) and the 'plonk' that personae hear when they loosen the 'ruby eye' object. Often seen as a prefix (1).
rule of eleven
noun The theory that all decent persona names are exactly one letter longer than the maximum that the game lets you have.
rumour
noun A half-truth, or out-and-out lie, concerning some aspect of the game of which the listening player is ignorant. This may be as a hint to get them to solve a puzzle on their own, or as a test of their gullibility (or - most likely - just for fun). The best rumours have some vestige of truth in them. rumours can be wind-ups, but are rarely propagated to fob some irritant away. Scams are often pilots for complex rumours. The cream of rumours develop into legends. BL wizzes have a penchant for rumours (ie. rumors), which they concoct and promote at the slightest opportunity.
rush
noun The pump of adrenalin that players often experience while having fun. "I don't kill mobiles if there are players around to off instead, you don't get the same rush".
RW
noun Abbreviation for 'real world'. See real world.

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q
prefix An abbreviation for 'quick' placed in front of many commands to give them either lesser functionality or a more concise (but less English) output form. For example, 'ql' means 'quick look', and 'qs' means 'quick score'. Sometimes, the Q merely implies "quicker to type than", so 'qw' is simply a synonym of 'who' ('w' is already taken as an abbreviation for 'west'); 'qq' is short for 'quit' ('q' on its own is too easy to type when you're aiming for 'w'!). On occasions, convoluted combinations of such abbreviated prefixes are available to cater for experimental uses or esoteric preferences, eg. 'sqw' (for 'superquickwho') does a 'who' without prefixes/postfixes on persona names, for the benefit of 40-column speccy owners. See l (2), s (2).
quest
noun A specific exercise set by a wiz to obtain some juicy reward (usually points). Sometimes quests are individualised (see test), but more often than not they involve as many mortals as wish to participate (and more...). Because quests take time to organise and are not always welcomed by players, they don't happen all that often. Well-designed quests can make for an exhilarating reset, nonetheless.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ?

parachute
noun A class (1) consisting of two objects, the 'parasol' and the 'umbrella'. Both are minor items of T, which change their value depending on the weather, but their main attraction is their other use...
parser
noun The part of the FE that breaks your input down into words and attempts to extract a command from them. This is the AI sense of the word. SUAs are sometimes said to have 'intelligent parsers' if they can fill in implied parts of a command using the dynamics of the situation, eg. 'light brand' in a room containing a fire would be sufficient evidence to assume you meant that the brand was to be lit from the fire. Although MUD does handle this kind of assessment, it's a feature (2) of the execution of specific commands rather than of the parser. Until fairly recently, MUD's parser was rather dumb, yet because it could perform this guesswork SUA devotees insisted on calling it 'intelligent'. See binder, command, vocabulary.
passive
adjective Of players, having a preference for deriving fun from activities done by (or in conjunction with) some other agent (either the game or players). Explorers will go to great lengths to coax the game into producing some nugget of wisdom, humour or insanity, but ultimately it's what the game does which is fulfilling, rather than their own actions. Likewise, socialisers may dominate a conversation, but they wouldn't have much fun in the long run if they were talking to an 'Eliza'-like drone. See active, HCDS.
PBS
noun Abbreviation for 'poor bloody superhero' (or '... superheroine'). Being big enough to be picked on, but not having the capacity to defend oneself. "These new weapons are neat, but they won't make much difference to PBSs". "The mage should have been able to handle him; it's the PBS I feel sorry for". The expression probably derives from the army term, 'poor bloody infantry'. See super.
PC
1. noun Abbreviation for 'portcullis'. To do the PC needs two or more people, and the question "PC?" is often observed, meaning "will you help me with the portcullis please?". Warning: killers love to lure people to the PC this way so as to jump them.
2. noun Abbreviation for 'program counter'. If the game is hanging, sometimes people will say "the PC is stuck". See timers.
3. noun Abbreviation for 'personal computer'. Usually an IBM PC or clone, but it can be used generically for any home micro.
4. noun Abbreviation for 'player character', ie. persona. People who use this will normally call mobiles NPCs. In all these cases, the term is usually fully capitalised.
perm
verb1 The act of being made a full (ie. 'permanent') wiz rather than remaining a mortal wiz, contingent upon the recommendation of a BB/BS. Mainly a BL term. "I can't do that, I haven't been permed yet". See wiz bit, mentor.
persona
noun Your persona is your representation in the game, ie. the virtual you in the virtual world modelled by the MUA. In MUD2, each account has room for three of these, and you can thus play under three different names (but only one at a time). If one persona is killed, the others aren't affected. Conventionally, the plural of persona is personae. There is a clear boundary between personae and players: the former are personality projections of the latter. Only wizzes can tell whether two personae are attributed to the same account or not, and if you want to pretend to be two different people they won't (or at least shouldn't!) tell... See player (1), role-play, character, persona name.
persona file
noun Where persona records are kept by MUD. If the persona file is wiped (ie. its contents are deleted), the result is catastrophic. wipes of persona files are sometimes threatened (and the threats sometimes carried out!) in MUAs with game management problems, or if staleness warrants a drastic change. wipes may also come at the end of a period of playtesting prior to a MUA's being launched publicly. MUAs that deliberately wipe persona files without warning tend not to be commercial at the time...
persona name
noun What a persona is called, as opposed to the persona as an object in the game. All persona names are unique. See snaffle, rule of eleven.
PK
1. noun Abbreviation of 'player killing': the concept of allowing one persona to attack and destroy another persona. Sometimes seen as PKing. See PvP.
2. noun A persona which indulges in PK (1). This use probably arose to complement PC (4), but is sometimes seen as PKer.
PK is usually, but not always, capitalised.
PKer
noun An alternative to PK (2), with the same meaning.
PKing
noun An alternative to PK (1), with the same meaning.
played out
adjective Of an area or even The Land in its entirety, having had its puzzles solved and its goodies removed. This will leave it empty (2). See also sparse (2).
player
1. noun The human being sitting at a terminal playing MUD, as opposed to their representation in the game (ie. their persona). In cases where the human being is so involved in the game that they feel it's really them in there, and that things /are/ happening to them personally (ie. they are having fun), the player and persona merge into one. In this case, the term player subsumes that of persona. See also role-play.
2. noun A class to which those objects in the game that are assumed to be run by human beings belong, especially when compared against mobiles. There are technical reasons for this, arising from some of the Strange Things that wizzes are able to do. Unless context indicates that a game object rather than a human being is implied, player (1) is the default usage. A message 'sent to all players', for example, does not mean that it is sent in the real world to all human beings playing at that moment, since it actually goes to their personae; however, to do something to all personae implies the inclusion of any not actually in the game at the time. Therefore, in this example players means the all current instances of the class of player objects.
play up
1. verb0 To act in an awkward manner. "The modems are playing up again".
2. verb1 To work up a new persona, normally all the way to wiz. There's no equivalent to work back up as a new persona won't have been there before. The implication is that the rise will be scrupulously honest, despite the possibility that the player could (morally, if not legally) obtain a few points by ulterior means. "If I wanted a wiz with a different name, I guess I'd have to play one up". See build up, frig up, kiss up, wizmort.
plodder
noun A player who doesn't have that spark. A term denoting pity more than dislike - plodders are often nice, puppy-dog people. Sadly, plodders don't even know they're plodders: they will spend hour after hour building up their personae, only to be blown away at will by someone who has that spark. Wizzes have nightmares that plodders will one day come in such numbers that they won't be able to handle them all at once (see rats! (3)) and some will make wiz by default. plodders are rarely deterred by death death (although they hate it), and they will usually start off again as if nothing had happened, much to the distress of the wiz killer who offed them ("It's like painting the Forth Bridge!"). In some MUAs, there is no such thing as death death when personae are attacked, only a loss of points; these games usually have severe game management problems because it is relatively easy to plod to wiz. Sometimes, a player who is in macro mode will implicitly recognise the fact by identifying with this kind of boring play. Q: "Hi, how's things?" A: "Oh, I'm just plodding along...". See nice guy.
point
noun Points are the unit of achievement in MUAs. If you have lots of points, you will be powerful; if you only have a few, you won't be. The value of treasure is measured in points, as are the rewards for solving certain puzzles and winning fights. When your points total exceeds a (usually doubling) threshhold, you will go up a level. See build up, work up, kill points, pt, exp, EP.
pointer
noun The class (1) consisting of the two members 'bow' and 'baton'. Waving one of them drops it and takes you to the location of the other. As most players can't be bothered to remember which one they're actually holding, they need merely 'wave pointer, get pointer' when they wish to use this means of teleportation. See ptr, bridge.
poodle
noun A player who is so in awe of another player that they follow their personae around obeying orders and generally toadying with pathetic abjectness. "Here comes Jaggy and his poodle". See marker, bodyguard.
pop
verb01 To be attacked. "I got popped in the hut waiting for icons". A BL term. See jump (2).
PORG
noun Abbreviation for 'person of restricted growth', ie. dwarf. Compare stumpy.
postfix
noun A short addition to a persona's full name, placed immediately after the level specifier, eg. "Alison the heroine who hates goblins". Only the POTM postfix is set by the game, the rest are creations of the damaged brains of wizzes. Note that postfix is the preferred term, rather than 'suffix'. Postfixes and prefixes can be placed on a name independently. See prefix.
post-processor
noun That part of the FE which prepares output for for display to the user. A version is built in to MUD2's FE program, but customised versions can be written and combined with a pre-processor to give a client. Post-processors are normally restricted to word-wrapping, highlighting, logging, windowing and (possibly) graphics.
POTM
1. noun Abbreviation for 'player of the month'. An award granted monthly, supposedly to the mortal who has played best that month. It used to be the case that you could only win it once, but nowadays multiple wins are possible; perhaps 'persona of the month' would be more accurate. The recipient of the POTM award is traditionally decided by a reluctant vote among the wizzes, and has a "Player of the Month" postfix on their name (which is read as "please kill me immediately"). Usually, but not always, fully capitalised. See POTM curse, DOTM.
2. noun Abbreviation for 'phase of the moon'. Things which happen non-deterministically and for no apparent reason are sometimes said to be caused by the POTM, especially buglets. Q: "Why did the piglet attack me just now when it's normally so sweet?" A: "It's the POTM".
POTM curse
noun The legendary fate befalling anyone voted POTM. Almost invariably, they meet a grisly end before their tenure is up - often within days of receiving the award. Foul play is not suspected. There used to be a similar curse on players making mage the first time, although this appears no longer to be the case.
PP
noun Abbreviation for 'protected persona'. A type of persona which cannot be attacked by other personae, and, reciprocally, which cannot itself attack or otherwise interfere with them. PPs have similar streams to non-PPs, however they top out earlier: there is no PP equivalent of mage/Sir/Lady, and excess points above that cannot be earned. PPs therefore can't ever score enough points to make wiz. personae can switch from non-PP to PP at no cost, but because life as a PP is easier they will lose two thirds of their points upon changing back. PPs are intended to be used by explorers and socialisers with no aspirations of making wiz for a while, but who enjoy other, non-competitive aspects of play.
prefix
1. noun A short addition to a persona's full name, placed immediately before the level specifier, eg. "Alison the goblin-hating heroine". This is normally done by wizzes, but sometimes the game will do it automatically for certain actions. prefixes and postfixes can exist in harmony. See postfix.
2. noun A letter placed in front of a command (2) to change its functionality. See q, s (2), l (2).
pre-processor
noun That part of the FE which prepares input for transmission to the parser. A version is built in to MUD2's FE program, but customised versions can be written and combined with a post-processor to give a client. pre-processors are normally restricted to login functions, menuing, hot-key programming and macro expansion.
privs
noun Privileges. Collectively, these are special status flags which are set for either a player, an account, or a persona. They each enable or disable a (different) form of individual treatment by the game. Some status flags are not regarded as PRIVS despite being implemented the same way, because they don't confer any advantage; for example "playing for free" would be a priv, but "being logged" would not. The term is normally pluralised even when used to refer to a single flag, eg. "You can't shout, you only have guest privs"; the singular form is used only to isolate a generic privilege for the purpose of discussing privs in general. To have privs is to be privved. See wiz bit.
protection
noun The pseudo-class of objects which prevent (or reduce the risk of being) assailed by other personae, in particular defences against 'summon' and 'force' spells. These objects are usually treasure as well, and it is a cause of great distress if a passing stealer relieves you of some protection then hares off to swamp it. When known killers are about, protection is essential. "I'm not going out there unless someone finds me some protection". In BL, the term is used exclusively to refer to defence against 'summon' spells. See non-T T.
psalm
verb0 How newbies think pslam is supposed to be spelled, before they learn what it stands for.
pslam
verb0 To break deliberately, from the player's end, the communications link between their home computer and the MUD host. This is normally effected by slamming the phone down on the receiver, hence the name (which was imported from CompuServe in general via BL). Pslamming is done in the vain hope that somehow it will extricate a persona from a situation with which the player cannot otherwise cope, most notably fights; this tactic fails with admirable reliability, leading to predictable moans about carrier loss. Sometimes, if a persona escapes a fight using means beyond the simple ken of their opponent, and then immediately quits, the player will be accused of having pslammed (which is illegal) and more moans will ensue. See drop carrier.
pt
noun Abbreviation for point (plural pts). Usually in lower case, and sometimes up against a number (eg. "200pts"), sometimes spaced apart ("200 pts"). The abbreviation can be used for point in all contexts. "How many pts do you need to make necro?". See k (2).
ptr
noun The contraction of pointer by which most players refer to the baton and the bow.
puest
noun A guest who is a pest.
pure
adjective A version of MUD (1) is pure if it sticks rigidly to the design goals of the authors, as perceived by the person describing it as pure. It is immaterial whether these design goals are real or imagined - people will readily argue with the authors over proposed changed which might render the game impure. Pureness an idealised notion of what it's like to experience MUD in its true form; since it doesn't actually exist, though, debate on the matter is next to impossible. What next - MUD fundamentalism?
PvP
noun Short for 'player versus player', although 'persona versus persona' is more accurate. PvP is the notion of allowing one persona to attack another persona, which, in general, MUD2 condones. However, there are occasions when the practice might be disallowed for a period by the wizzes, eg. it is often announced that there will be no PvP in a forthcoming mobile bash. The term is sometimes written as P V P, or all in lower case. See PK (1).

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o
verb0 The 'out' directional command. Repeated use of o from most sensible rooms will lead to the ford where Valley connects to Simon's rooms, although from MUD1 rooms you'll stick at NRBL if you're carrying anything.
object
1. noun Something in the game which exists therein as a physical entity. Even seemingly amorphous things like smells and (in MUD1) views of places can be objects. Items in the vocabulary refer to objects, and commands manipulate objects, but neither are themselves objects.
2. noun Something at the bottom of the CLASS hierarchy. "If you K DWARF you'll attack all the ones present because DWARF is a class. You want D17 - that's an object". See class (1).
3. noun Something which is not a mobile or a player or a room or (sometimes) a container. This MUD1 usage carried over into other MUAs, including MUD2. "The apple can't move on its own, it's just an object".
4. verb0 What wizzes do if they disagree with something about to be imposed by arch-wizzes or by a majority of active wizzes. In the UK, always ineffective; in the USA, always effective.
5. noun In grammatical terms, the 'direct object' of a sentence. In MUAs, the basic form of a sentence is <verb> <noun> <preposition> <noun>, and therefore the first <noun> is the object. The second <noun> is the instrument. See command (2).
off
verb1 To kill a persona (or sometimes a mobile) dead dead. "The vampire offed my necro last night".
output
1. noun What your FE displays on your screen. This normally doesn't mean characters (2) echoed back from your input, except when this echoing fails. line-noise usually manifests itself in output as gibberishly random characters splurged together. See input (1).
2. verb1 To cause output (1) to appear. "Then the FE outputs a blank line". See input (2).